Arrival and Departure

Arrival and Departure

Arrival and Departure Alternate cover for ISBN ISBN Spring Peter Slavek a student hero who has survived interrogation by torture has escaped from an oppressive dictatorship He arrives in N

  • Title: Arrival and Departure
  • Author: Arthur Koestler
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 292
  • Format: Paperback
  • Alternate cover for ISBN 0140181199 ISBN13 9780140181197 Spring 1941 Peter Slavek, a student hero who has survived interrogation by torture, has escaped from an oppressive dictatorship He arrives in Neutralia, a tense clearing house for refugees en route for uneasy peace or total war.Among them are Odette, a beautiful child widow Bernard, an epicene Fascist proselytAlternate cover for ISBN 0140181199 ISBN13 9780140181197 Spring 1941 Peter Slavek, a student hero who has survived interrogation by torture, has escaped from an oppressive dictatorship He arrives in Neutralia, a tense clearing house for refugees en route for uneasy peace or total war.Among them are Odette, a beautiful child widow Bernard, an epicene Fascist proselytizer and the massive but nubile psychologist Dr Sonia Bolgar, who gives Peter the run of her flat return for the run of his mind.Arthur Koestler s nightmare allegory hinges on the dilemma of the revolutionary who realizes that power can corrupt not only its wielders, but its victims.

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      Published :2019-04-26T00:42:47+00:00

    694 Comment

    The battle in this book is really between deeply held beliefs and rationalization.Peter Slavek, a tortured ex-Communist, escapes from what I can only take to be the Nazi regime (labels are never given to either party), stows away on a ship and swims ashore to a state called Neutralia (which I took for Portugal or France, perhaps) where is taken in charge by an older woman, Sonia, a psychotherapist and friend of his family. Walking the streets of Neutralia while waiting for a visa to join the Bri [...]

    Σας έχει τύχει κάποτε να πάτε επίσκεψη και να σας καλέσουν στο τραπέζι, μ’ ένα πεντανόστιμο γεύμα, φτιαγμένο με τα πιο απλά υλικά; Έτσι είναι κι ετούτο το βιβλίο: απ’ την πρώτη σελίδα προσκαλεί σε κόσμο ταπεινών λέξεων που συνθέτους εικόνες. Το τέλος των προτάσεων οργανώνει [...]

    An interesting and thought provoking book on choices, moral commitment, the individual's needs vs the "greater" needs and why one may be the person one is. Peter Slavek escapes from a regime of torture and terror, finds himself in a neutral country while he waits for a visa. His first wish is to go to England and help fight; the other option is to go to America where he'll be safe from war and all it holds. While he waits for first one visa, then the other, he contemplates how his thoughts & [...]

    The third novel of a loosely-related trilogy that explores the conflict between morality and expediency and the ruptures that this conflict brings in the context of one's own nature and ideological standpoint. If you can suppress the urge to toss it aside through some extremely dubious thoughts on sexual consent and seduction, it's a great exploration of a tricky subject. B+.

    A bit lackluster when compared to Darkness at Noon. I like the sense of atmosphere Koestler is aiming for, but sometimes it seems hamfisted. I thought this book was a bad translation at first, but it seems it was originally written in English.Darkness at Noon is much better. Go for that.

    The rating of three stars on this book does not reflect the book uniformly, but rather is an averaging because some parts are really good, and some parts are really disappointing. It is a good bildungsroman in that the hero of the story comes to know the way the world works, where he fits into it, and what his proper actions should be. However, that he finds it out in large part by the Freudian analysis by a large woman is gimmicky and cliched. The mid-Twentieth Century male illusion that an ide [...]

    The style of this novel feels far less adroit than the earlier Darkness at Noon, and it is certainly far less popular, but thematically the two belong together as a literary exploration of the political choices available in the 1930s. While communism, in it's Stalinist Orthodox form, required Rubashov to accept martyrdom - for the good of the cause. In this novel the hero has escaped, after imprisonment and torture, from the far right authoritarian government in Hungary to a neutral country, a f [...]

    Peter Slavek, tidligere medlem av kommunistpartiet i Ungarn, har klart å rømme fra hjemlandet sitt og kommer til "Neutralia", et nøytralt land basert på Portugal. Før han kom seg unna fikk han selv føle de skrekkelige uhyrlighetene som var i ferd med å oversvømme Europa i krigens kjølvann. Peter ble nemlig torturert nesten til døde for sitt engasjement i den sosialistiske revolusjonen, og han sliter med mareritt og psykiske problemer som ettervirkninger av dette.I "Neutralia" treffer h [...]

    Oda Yayınları’dan okuduğum Haçsız Haçlılar; aslında yazarı Arthur Koestler’in en çok bilinen eseri arasında yerini almıyor. Koestler’in 13. Kabile ve Gün Ortasında Karanlık isimli eserleri en bilinenleri imiş. Bu nedenle yazarın tek bir kitabını okuduğum için eleştirmem gereken birden çok nokta olmasına rağmen çoğunu es geçmek zorunda hissediyorum kendimi. Haçsız Haçlılar’a gelecek olursak olay kurgusuna ve konusuna bayıldığımı belirtmekle beraber kit [...]

    What an odd book this was. I gather it is semi-autobiographical, about Koestler's experience as a refugee in the middle of WWII. The country he lands in as a refugee he calls "Neutralia". I found the name so distracting as I was continually looking for clues about what country it could be. Turns out it was based on portugal where Koestler did actually land. At any rate, despite it's oddness, it was an interesting portrait of a person in limbo awaiting news of his fate at the hands of the authori [...]

    A fantastic book - about World War II, the Holocaust, and political torture, but also about why we do the things we do. Beautiful, simplistic, occasionally reductive, both specific and allegorical. Here was my favorite quote. "Yes, he submitted with open eyes, more 'in spite of' than 'because of.'The first time he had set out in ignorance of his reasons; this time he knew them but understood that reasons do not matter so much. They are the shell around the core; and the core remains untouchable, [...]

    I enjoyed the start of the book even though I did not like the disguise the author seemed be so determined to keep up about so many things, like what country they were in . The entire middle of the book seems so unreal to me and the ending anticlimactic . Will try the other book by this author as it got better reviews.

    I'm not sure if I read this before or after Last of the Just but I think they're the only books I've read about the Holocaust. In this book we know the hero has survived and is physically well but the book is about the struggle he goes through on the inside.

    Many incisive reflections on ideology. Seems really remarkable for when it was written for its view of fascism. (A bit too Freudian for today.)

    متاسفانه به نظرم کتاب خسته کننده ای بود و ریتم جذابی نداشت

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