Der Streit um den Sergeanten Grischa

Der Streit um den Sergeanten Grischa

Der Streit um den Sergeanten Grischa Der Streit um den Sergeanten Grischa als erstes Buch des Zyklus Der Gro e Krieg der wei en M nner erschienen ist innerhalb dieser Romanfolge thematisch der vierte Band Im M rz flieht d

  • Title: Der Streit um den Sergeanten Grischa
  • Author: Arnold Zweig
  • ISBN: 9783746652078
  • Page: 146
  • Format: Paperback
  • Der Streit um den Sergeanten Grischa , 1927 28 als erstes Buch des Zyklus Der Gro e Krieg der wei en M nner erschienen, ist innerhalb dieser Romanfolge thematisch der vierte Band.Im M rz 1918 flieht der russische Kriegsgefangene Paprotkin aus einem Lager in Litauen Er will nach Hause, ostw rts Er will sein Kind sehen, das er noch nicht kennt Als eine deutsche Streife Der Streit um den Sergeanten Grischa , 1927 28 als erstes Buch des Zyklus Der Gro e Krieg der wei en M nner erschienen, ist innerhalb dieser Romanfolge thematisch der vierte Band.Im M rz 1918 flieht der russische Kriegsgefangene Paprotkin aus einem Lager in Litauen Er will nach Hause, ostw rts Er will sein Kind sehen, das er noch nicht kennt Als eine deutsche Streife ihn gefangennimmt, folgt er dem Rat der Partisanin Babka, die ihn liebt Ahnungslos gibt er sich als der verstorbene berl ufer Bjuschew aus Er wird der Spionage verd chtigt und zum Tode verurteilt Von nun an wird Grischas Schicksal zum juristischen Fall, zu einer Frage der Kompetenzen.

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    During the late 20's many of those who experienced World War I wrote semi-autobiographical novels. One of them was Arnold Zweig (1887-1968), a German writer, anti-war and anti-fascist activist. He is known for his six-part cycle on World War I called The Great War of the White Men and the first part of it is this 1001 book, The Case of Sargeant Grischa.The story is about mistaken identity. Sergeant Grischa is a Russian POW in Germany during WWI and he escapes with the help of his lover, Babka an [...]

    A stirring novel full of beautiful descriptions of the settings in which the title character, a Russian POW during WWI, escapes from the timber camp, heads for home, gets recaptured and sentenced to death. I was extremely impressed with the language used to describe nature and the feelings of the characters.

    German writer’s Arnold Zweig’s reputation was founded on “The Case of Sergeant Grischa” (1927), as Germany was racked by the aftermath of war, by occupation of the Ruhr Valley, the weight of one-sided reparations, the recent ravages of hyperinflation, and the rise of the disenfranchised Brown Shirts of the National Socialist Party’s SS. Zweig tells of the failed escape of a Russian prisoner of war, who comes to be mistakenly condemned to death on suspicion of spying. Zweig adaptation o [...]

    Reading Arnold Zweig's "Case of Sergeant Grischa" brings to mind what a wretched century the 1900s were. After all, Zweig's novel takes place at the bitter end of World War I, as a Russian soldier (voting with his feet, as Lenin is said to have put it) tries to find his way home from behind the German lines. As an evasive manouver, he takes on the identity of a deceased soldier, and through an obscure tweak of regulations, becomes subject to the death penalty. The German military, composed large [...]

    An astonishing, devastating novel. It's been a very long time since I read anything that got under my skin so much. The night when I tried to go to bed with about sixty pages left to read I found I couldn't sleep.This book is an outstanding example of how good writing elevates whatever the subject is -- the story could easily have been sentimental and the moralizing heavy-handed (there are one or two moments that the author doesn't quite pull off) but it turned out beautifully. The last chapter [...]

    Brilliant and moving account of an incident which occured in the first world war. Russian Grischa escapes from a prisoner of war camp and decides to walk home, he gets lost and is eventually recaptured but he has taken the identity of a deserter and is sentenced to be shot. Can he prove his innocence or will the words of one of the characters prove true, " the Divisional Court Martial works like a machine, whaen once a man is caught init , he only comes out as a corpse"

    This is about justice, which among many other things, determines the fate of nations. And this seems to have done just that - after the book was written. We have a little voice within us which tells us the right thing to do, but if it's hard to hear the little voice, we have the Torah to guide us.The setting: the German eastern front, 1917.

    Set largely on the Eastern front during WWI Zweig's novel focusses on a very specific and singular injustice. Like all similar tales that describe the difficulty of obtaining justice in wartime it often borders on the absurd, being saved only by the meticulous description and exploration of the inner states of the various characters. An excellent tale.

    This novel of the First World War is both epic and masterful. It is the story of an ordinary Russian soldier who escapes from prison camp and decides to walk home to his family. In the process of returning he assumes the identity of a dead soldier, but then his real adventures begin.

    German book written in 1928, one of the earlier novels of WW I. A Russian POW escapes from captivity, and when recaptured is sentenced to death in a case of mistaken identity. Very interesting viewpoint on German attitude toward Jews (Zweig was Jewish). Very unusual and worthwhile book!

    Fascinating read about a Russian who escaped from a German prisoner of war camp, only to find himself back in the German's clutches. At the advice of a Russian woman he had met after his escape, Grischa indicates that he is a German soldier who deserted his unit. But that makes the situation worse, as all deserters are to be executed immediately. Once Grischa finds out his fate, he recants his story and tells the truth. The situation turns political, as some parties want to return him to Russia [...]

    to look into/hunt downFrom wiki: The Case of Sergeant Grischa (1927) is a war novel by the German writer Arnold Zweig. Its original German title is Der Streit um den Sergeanten Grischa. It is part of Zweig's hexalogy Der große Krieg der weißen Männer (The great war of white men). It was part of the so-called "war book boom" of the late 1920s, during which many veterans of the First World War turned their memories and experiences into semi-autobiographical novels. The first English edition was [...]

    I enjoyed this book, and I got really into it in the middle, but because it's a translation and it deals with such a heavy topic the pace can be quite slow and it can be difficult to read. None-the-less, I'm glad I read it!

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