The Atheist's Way: Living Well Without Gods

The Atheist's Way: Living Well Without Gods

The Atheist s Way Living Well Without Gods In The Atheist s Way Eric Maisel teaches you how to make rich personal meaning despite the absence of beneficent gods and the indifference of the universe to human concerns Exploding the myth that th

  • Title: The Atheist's Way: Living Well Without Gods
  • Author: Eric Maisel
  • ISBN: 9781577316428
  • Page: 167
  • Format: Paperback
  • In The Atheist s Way, Eric Maisel teaches you how to make rich personal meaning despite the absence of beneficent gods and the indifference of the universe to human concerns Exploding the myth that there is any meaning to find or to seek, Dr Maisel explains why the paradigm shift from seeking meaning to making meaning is this century s most pressing intellectual goal.

    The Atheist s Way Living Well Without Gods Living Well The Atheist s Way Living Well Without Gods Living Well Without Love Eric Maisel ISBN Kostenloser Versand fr alle Bcher mit Versand und Verkauf duch . The Atheist s Way Living Well Without Gods The Atheist s Way Living Well Without Gods Eric Maisel ISBN Kostenloser Versand fr alle Bcher mit Versand und Verkauf duch . The Atheist s Way Living Well Without Gods This item The Atheist s Way Living Well Without Gods by Ph.D Eric Maisel Paperback . Only left in stock order soon Ships from and sold by bookslittle. The Atheist s Way Living Well Without Gods by Unlike other atheist books, The Atheists Way, explains to both new atheists, those on the cusp of atheism and non atheists what exactly it is that atheists believe in.Most people equate atheists with negative cynics and stoics, but the reality is that atheism can mean an extremely positive and beautiful existence the atheist s way is a rich way, as rich as life itself page . The Atheist s Way Eric Maisel The Atheist s Way Living Well Without Gods is the culmination of that thinking Infused with palpable joy, but also with hardheaded practicality, The Atheist s Way offers a manifesto and operational paradigm for unbelievers. Seven Ways Atheists Are Religious Answers in Atheists will tell you they are not religious, but several characteristics identify atheists as religious In this article, I deal with seven of those characteristics In this article, I The Atheist s Way Three women s spiritual journeys Eric Maisel, author of The Atheist s Way, blogs on issues of interest to atheists, secular humanists, freethinkers, rationalists, and existentialists Learn about Atheist Living with guest correspondents from around the world If you would like to become a guest correspondent, visit The Atheist s Way website Sunday, September , Three women s spiritual journeys by writerdd I Rise of the Atheists Why are we losing our America is the most religious country in the developed world And a lot of people here are NOT down with atheists Check this out % of Americans wouldn t vote for an atheist for president %

    • ☆ The Atheist's Way: Living Well Without Gods || ☆ PDF Read by ¶ Eric Maisel
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    Unlike other atheist books, The Atheist’s Way, explains to both new atheists, those on the cusp of atheism and non-atheists what exactly it is that atheists believe in. Most people equate atheists with negative cynics and stoics, but the reality is that atheism can mean an extremely positive and beautiful existence; “…the atheist's way is a rich way, as rich as life itself” (page 2).This books shows everyone just how meaningful, fulfilled and ethical an atheist’s life is. I’ve seen s [...]

    Wow, this is some crap. I'm really disappointed in Dale McGowan, Dan Barker, and Hemant Mehta for their enthusiastic blurbs for this on . Maisel appears to think if he repeats the word "meaning" a whole lot, his hot air becomes meaningful. Nope. The question of purpose and satisfaction in a godless life is a valuable one, but Maisel doesn't investigate it with any concreteness or specificity. He instead just tells his readers that meaning means whatever you want it to mean and exhorts us repeate [...]

    It’s not always easy to explain what being an atheist means, other than not believing in God or religion. Maisel not only explains what it means to be an atheist, free from religious dogma, but how to make meaning and become the hero in one’s own life. How we live, what we decided to invest meaning in, what our values and morals are, he asserts are the true paths to happiness, fulfillment and peace. We do not seek meaning, we make it. We create purpose and passion by deciding to. He affirms [...]

    This is a good practical guide to finding meaning without resorting to things that other such books might suggest: praying for guidance, getting spiritual guidance from a guru or tarot cards or scripture. It is all about finding within yourself what it is that means something to you, finding a way to become your own hero rather than allowing or forcing someone else to choose for you. It is a self-help book for atheists, and a good one for those in need of the assistance. I was not searching for [...]

    This book offers an interesting approach to living without God/s. Instead of living according to a traditional set of values prescribed by a religion, Meisel shows you how to consciously make your own meanings for your life based on what is valuable to you.I had never really thought about morality and living a "right life" in the author's terms, but I think a lot of nonreligious people wind up doing that unconsciously.

    First Read, 22 March 2009: We need more books like this!Second Read, 13 Oct 2010: It is a comfort to read this book: just knowing there are a few people out there with a similar world view. And still, "we need more books like this!" :)

    A good, compact response to the oft-asked question, "If you're an atheist, how can you possible be moral/happy/etc/etc/etc."

    Fantastic perspective on living free from religion. A total paradigm shift a must for those that have left religion.

    [See my full review at my Examiner column: examiner/examiner/x-42] . . . Maisel's important mission is to help atheists face the truth of their circumstances, and in his book he gives some guidance as to what to do with once those circumstances are honestly understood. His message, I found, is crucial. His execution, however, is somewhat flawed, if nobly so.This book offers a vital message that I think any nonreligious person needs to hear, even if they don't realize they need to hear it: There [...]

    Reads a little like a self-help book penned by Jean-Paul Sartre. Maisel's main theme is that we must all make our own meaning. In some ways, this is refreshing, simply because much of the "new atheism" pays little attention to building a constructive sense of what atheism might be FOR (focusing exclusively on what atheists are AGAINST). It was also refreshing to see a complex treatment of how some atheists construct ethics (I haven't read enough about that).I'd be interested in seeing what a ske [...]

    Not a book that bashes god or religion, instead offers tips on how to live life without these beliefs. This is especially handy for someone who used to believe.Throughout the author quotes the experiences of others from a wide array of abandoned beliefs - no matter what flavor of atheist you are, there's probably at least one person in this book with a former belief similar to your old one. These are especially useful.The author challenges us to create our own meaning, which is a great idea. Unf [...]

    This book was clearly intended for those who have recently left their religion and might find themselves at odds with their newly discovered free time. Although Maisel does a good job in detailing all the ways in which one can live a meaningful life without having to go to church, the most important take-away message that I got was that it is perfectly ok for you to decide what meaning you want to give to your own life. I recommend this book to those who left religion after having it be such a l [...]

    I am sure the author meant well but he pretty much portrays atheism as a religion. If this book helps anyone leave gods behind that would be wonderful and perhaps it would be useful to people who are struggling with the question of whether they will be 'good' if they give up religion. For the atheist however, there is not much here.This book is well written and thoughtful and provides a pleasant read as long as you are not offended by the religious tone.

    I largely agree with Maisel's philosophy: that we should live according to our own values, and make our own choices rather than defaulting without question to the received wisdom provided by religious and societial institutions. However, he insists that depression and mental illness is caused by people not living according to the principles laid out in his books. That just makes him look like a dick.

    So - you don't believe in God or you're thinking about not believing in Godw what? This book creates a great discussion on creating and maintaining meaning in our lives in the absence of "supernatural enthusiasms." Its thoughtful and accessible. Unlike many atheist writers who go on angry tirades against God and religion, Maisel gently demonstrates how one might make meaning and ethics in a godless universe. I love this book.

    Although Im not ready to define myself as an athiest, this book certainly makes me consider it. It's provocative, compelling, well-argued and gives a strong case for making meaning in one's life. I see the damage that religion has done on many people close to me and I can only hope this book enters their lives.

    This was rather "preachy" (ironically) and heavy emphasis on including "there is no god" wherever he thinks he can slip it in. That's not to say I didn't find some well thought out content within this, but the writing style was rather unpalatable.

    This book has a useful premise, but even at only 175 pages, it wasn't substantive enough -- too cutesy, anecdotal, and repetitive. It could have been condensed into a pamphlet. You've got the gist 30 pages in.

    Meh, maybe I expected too much after reading the covers. The book can be read in an afternoon. The audience that might most appreciate this book is one that is struggling with meaning and needs a quick push in the right direction.

    Basically it's existentialism for beginners. The existentialism is pretty much used as a self help tool. He argues that in the face of the fact that there is no God and no meaning in the universe we have to create our own meaning. Not that bad really and easily readable in a day or two.

    Given a lack of a god to give meaning to your life, you create your own meaning in the things you do. I've just described in one sentence what it takes this book 175 pages to explain. Anyone who's already an atheist already knows this, and anyone not an atheist isn't going to read this book.

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