Edmund and Rosemary Go to Hell: A Story We All Really Need Now More Than Ever

Edmund and Rosemary Go to Hell: A Story We All Really Need Now More Than Ever

Edmund and Rosemary Go to Hell A Story We All Really Need Now More Than Ever One Sunday afternoon an ordinary couple named Edmund and Rosemary decide to go for a walk in their Brooklyn neighborhood Within moments they are plunged into a wonderful nerve racking hilarious u

  • Title: Edmund and Rosemary Go to Hell: A Story We All Really Need Now More Than Ever
  • Author: Bruce Eric Kaplan
  • ISBN: 9781416545491
  • Page: 113
  • Format: Hardcover
  • One Sunday afternoon, an ordinary couple named Edmund and Rosemary decide to go for a walk in their Brooklyn neighborhood Within moments, they are plunged into a wonderful, nerve racking, hilarious, unique adventure that begins with a cell phone and ends in a jungle halfway around the world.In Edmund and Rosemary Go to Hell, famed New Yorker cartoonist Bruce Eric Kaplan uOne Sunday afternoon, an ordinary couple named Edmund and Rosemary decide to go for a walk in their Brooklyn neighborhood Within moments, they are plunged into a wonderful, nerve racking, hilarious, unique adventure that begins with a cell phone and ends in a jungle halfway around the world.In Edmund and Rosemary Go to Hell, famed New Yorker cartoonist Bruce Eric Kaplan uses his trademark incisive wit to explore what it is that prevents us from seeing all that we have By turns wickedly funny and oddly touching, this provocative and ultimately hopeful picture book for adults will appeal to anyone who has ever been stuck in traffic or, to the point, stuck inside themselves.

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      113 Bruce Eric Kaplan
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      Posted by:Bruce Eric Kaplan
      Published :2020-01-10T15:42:40+00:00

    862 Comment

    L'Enfer, C'est les Autres à Huis ClosBruce Eric Kaplan'sDrawings prove Hell is our viewOf other people.Inconsequential PerplexityAs some people know,It's not overstood, unlessYou underthink it.Consequential SimplexityThe black on white line drawings and lay out are superb. The text is equally subtle and economical. It's tempting to criticise the text for its implied or inferred politics, but to do so might comprise overthinking. It's best just to enjoy the beauty.

    This book is most excellent and takes all of 20 minutes to read (and that's if your ADD is acting up and you keep wanting to go ride bikes or maybe the cat keeps making that horking sound and you have to keep getting up to see if the pointy little furbag is actually puking behind the couch or just rehearsing for some bizarre vomit opera to be performed later while you sleep). You should read this book. Everyone should read this book. Our president should read this book. Granted, it won't teach h [...]

    More adult picture book than graphic novel. This is a pretty neat book. If the world is just getting you down, you should read it.

    cute. a total impulse buy after a night of good tips. it's short and sweet, maybe taking 15 minutes to read in all. depressed about the state of their lives and the world around them edmund and rosemary convince themselves that they are in fact living in hell. after a long search for evidence leads them to a high ranking official in washington their fears are confirmed. he admits that they are in fact in hell and offers them the winning numbers for a lotto. after indulging in their spoils and tr [...]

    Edmund and Rosemary, two very ordinary people, realize that their life and all the annoyances we wish didn't exist, from too many loud cell phone users to box stores that carry everything but what we need, are a clear sign that they're really in hell.Through a series of funny drawings and sparse text, our heroes ferret out the truth from the Feds--who else could be behind such a plot?--and are bribed into silence.But what good is money if you know you're in hell? And what about the devil you kno [...]

    Bruce Eric Kaplan's New Yorker cartoons were often some of my favorites, so I expected to find the book clever and witty, but I was surprised to find several quite sweet and touching details as well. This is a very quick read - but in not many words or images, Kaplan manages to convey a lot of feeling. Some of it, like Edmund and Rosemary's disdain for cell phones, movies, Pop art and all the rest, is frequent complaint fodder and although you've heard it before, the frustrating realization mome [...]

    I am familiar with the artists work from the New Yorker but this is the first thing of his that I have read that is longer than one panel. This is a very quick read but lots of fun. It kind of feels like it was written by/for octogenarians because of all the griping about the modern world but I could still connect with it. On bad days it feels like I am in hell (as protrayed here) and even on good days I can sympathize with many of the issues Edmund and Rosemary must endure. This is a fun read a [...]

    Bookseller: MarkEdmond and Rosemary Go to Hell--a New Yorker cartoon expanded into a graphic novella--is an hilarious, deadpan look at modern life by one of the best, acerbic comic artists now writing & drawing. His characters look pretty vacant, but--gulp--they also look disquietingly like us. Ed & Rose feel assaulted (&, more, insulted) by popular culture, reaching a crisis point where they try to do something about it. This modern-day INFERNO also has its Purgatorio & Paradiso [...]

    Now I know what to call the world I live in.If it weren't for quite a bit of misogyny toward the Rosemary character, I'd give it 5 stars. Example would be when Edmund is given an envelope: "Edmund quickly gave it to Rosemary to open, in case it was a bomb" What the hell? Also, the art style is pretty bland and simple. Which seems to reflect the author's simple-minded views against cis-women.All in all, despite missing some important elements of not being oppressive and ignorant, this is an impor [...]

    An adorable quick comic about the pain we feel inside and how we can feel whole again. It won't change your life, but it will put a smile on your face.

    A cute short graphic novel(story?) about some middle class new yorkers who discover that this is Hell, the place itself. I rather enjoyed the opening when they get all uppity about the same middle-class complaints that are inevitable these days (too many people on cellphones, too much traffic, tv sucks, etc.) It could go further, maybe, or maybe it went as far as the idea could take it. This is the guy who does all those New Yorker cartoons.

    It was the title that first attracted me to his comic/graphic mini novel. It's a tale about a couple that is exasperated from senseless consumerism, felt that there is a diminishing return from humanity, and an ailing planet that is doomed. All these problems are made trivial when it ends up being the background for a simple love story between Edmund and Rosemary. The story is anti-climatic, but the drawings are endearing.

    Bruce Eric Kaplan's illustration style is instantly recognizable to anyone who's read one of his "New Yorker" cartoons. Less familiar -- and previously unknown to me -- is his fiction. I was charmed by this deadpan funny, low key fable about how the experience of being in Hell (or Heaven) is determined by your thoughts, expectations and interpretation of circumstances.

    Um, I didn't get it. I liked the artwork (particularly their cat) and I loved how they gradually came to the realization that they must be in hell (I feel like that all the timeWHY is everyone and everything so bloody annoying?!??). And I certainly wouldn't mind the winning lottery ticket. But the ending did not make sense to me.

    Short graphic story about a couple realizing the world they live in is hell. If the author's goal was to comfort me didnt really hit the mark. Its cute but it doesnt really question "our hellish society".

    It's a cute 5 minute read. Seriously, 5 minutes. But in that 5 minutes it deals with struggling to be content, even happy with what you have instead of focusing on what you don't like. It's an funny, silly, optimistic book that takes place in hell. Go figure

    A very quick read. I didn't like the first half very much, because the characters were so negative about literally everything, but then the second half was better. The ending was very sweet and the characters developed a better mindset.

    Super dry humor, which worked well. I liked the message of the book, but it didn't jive with my tastes as much as I would have liked. Still, it can be read in less than 5 minutes, so there is no harm in trying this out.

    This breif graphic novel tells the story of a quiet couple who go out for the evening and make a very startling discovery. Rude cell-phone screamers, endless traffic jams, big box stores--clearly, they are living in Hell!

    Short and sweet. Lacks the strange pungency of his best NY'er cartoons, and of his excellent book of cartoons (the name of which currently escapes me), but as a fable, it made me smile while reaching for the next book on the bedside table.

    A couple look around at all the rude people on cell phones, tons of traffic, bad television, etc. and realize they are in HELL. I have often thought the same thing.

    Positively delightful. It takes about 20 minutes to read and is a must-read for every cranky person in your life. Including yourself.

    Would living in Hell be tolerable if you got to live there with the person you love? Edmund and Rosemary ponder this question in this really sweet fable for our times.

    Now, just tell me, who could not identify with this delightful couple? A darkly sensitive cautionary reminder to live each day. Everyone should read this.

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