No Bone Unturned: The Adventures of a Top Smithsonian Forensic Scientist and the Legal Battle for America's Oldest Skeletons

No Bone Unturned: The Adventures of a Top Smithsonian Forensic Scientist and the Legal Battle for America's Oldest Skeletons

No Bone Unturned The Adventures of a Top Smithsonian Forensic Scientist and the Legal Battle for America s Oldest Skeletons When he s not at a notorious disaster Doug Owsley is entering tombs and crypts unwrapping mummies or climbing into caves to unlock the secrets of bones In No Bone Unturned investigative journalist

  • Title: No Bone Unturned: The Adventures of a Top Smithsonian Forensic Scientist and the Legal Battle for America's Oldest Skeletons
  • Author: Jeff Benedict
  • ISBN: 9780060199234
  • Page: 215
  • Format: Hardcover
  • When he s not at a notorious disaster, Doug Owsley is entering tombs and crypts, unwrapping mummies, or climbing into caves to unlock the secrets of bones.In No Bone Unturned, investigative journalist Jeff Benedict not only unveils a compelling portrait of the man behind America s most notorious cases but also gives us a fascinating look inside the world of forensic sciencWhen he s not at a notorious disaster, Doug Owsley is entering tombs and crypts, unwrapping mummies, or climbing into caves to unlock the secrets of bones.In No Bone Unturned, investigative journalist Jeff Benedict not only unveils a compelling portrait of the man behind America s most notorious cases but also gives us a fascinating look inside the world of forensic science as seen through the eyes of a leading specialist.Doug Owsley s extraordinary talent has put his phone number on speed dial for federal agencies, from the FBI to the CIA and the State Department When the Branch Davidian compound in Waco caught fire, when a terrorist flown plane crashed into the Pentagon, and when mass graves were uncovered in Croatia, the authorities called Owsley Through cutting edge science, instinctive artistry, and dogged tenacity, Owsley painstakingly rebuilds the skeleton, and helps identify it and determine the cause of death.A curator for the Smithsonian s Museum of Natural History, Doug Owsley has handled over ten thousand human skeletons, than anyone else in America He has worked with America s historic skeletons, from, colonial Jamestown burials to Plains Indians to Civil War soldiers to skeletons tens of thousands of years old.That includes the Kennewick Man, a 9,600 year old human skeleton found in shallow water along the banks of Washington State s Columbia River It was a skeleton that would turn Owsley s life upside down.Days before Owsley was scheduled to begin studying the skeleton, the U.S Army Corps of Engineers seized it and announced they would repatriate Kennewick Man, burying his bones on the land of the Native American tribes who claimed him Along with seven of America s leading scientists, Owsley sued the U.S government over custody At stake was a wide body of knowledge about our past and our history that would be lost forever if the bones were reburied For six years, Owsley fought a legal and political battle that put everything at risk, jeopardizing his career and his reputation.

    • Ò No Bone Unturned: The Adventures of a Top Smithsonian Forensic Scientist and the Legal Battle for America's Oldest Skeletons || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ Jeff Benedict
      215 Jeff Benedict
    • thumbnail Title: Ò No Bone Unturned: The Adventures of a Top Smithsonian Forensic Scientist and the Legal Battle for America's Oldest Skeletons || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ Jeff Benedict
      Posted by:Jeff Benedict
      Published :2019-08-15T05:42:08+00:00

    977 Comment

    This book is about a topic that is controversial in so many aspects. Kennewick Man.If you don't know who Kennewick Man is, here's some basic background information that you could probably find just by googling him: Kennewick Man turned up on the banks of the Columbia River on July 28, 1996. The police gave him to the county coroner, Floyd Johnson, who promptly had James Chatters, a specialist in human remains. James Chatters took one look at the skeleton and noted that it had a distinctly europe [...]

    I enjoy both books and shows about forensics. I love that small details mean something specific and using multiple details can winnow out potential scenarios into fewer more probable ones. Disproven theories discarded - but potentially reviewed if new evidence points to them again. :) This particular book is more about the cultural issues around forensic anthropology and the Kennewick Man case in particular rather than the methods. I suspected this would be the case since the book was shelved wi [...]

    The subtitle of this book is a bit misleading is partially a biography of a Smithsonian archaeologist and human bone specialist, Doug Owsley, with short chapters on some of his work at Waco and in Guatemala, and partially an account of the lawsuit he & several other anthropologists were involved in over the right to study Kennewick Man, a 9600 y.o. skeleton found eroding out of the Columbia River in Washington state.In 1990, a law called NAGPRA (Native American Grave Protection & Repatri [...]

    MY God, this was bad. I bought the book believing that, following the subtitle " the legal battle for America´s Oldest Skeletons", it was to tell me something about the Kennewick Man case, without having to read hundreds of scientific articles about it. In some sense, this was true, but the main story of the book is unfortunately a eulogy for Doug Owsley, forensic at the Smithonsian Institute and one of the participants in the Kennewick trial. After reading the book, I am familiar with Dougs f [...]

    I LOVED this book. I remember when the Kennewick man was first found and I remember my frustration when I heard how the government was dicking the scientists around with regards to studying him. A 9,800 year old nearly complete skeleton was, in my mind, far to rare and valuable NOT to study! while the author was clearly working with Doug Owsley (the real life Smithsonian forensic anthropologist that it seems Temperance 'Bones' Brennan was based on in both the Kathy Reiches novels and the TV show [...]

    Even though I m intrigued with forensics, I wondered if my unscientific mind could follow this book. What a pleasant surprise. Well written, held my attention, interesting facts made for a great read. One downside was too much info about trial. I just skipped over that but was still able to follow everything. Great job on research and writing !!!!

    This book is really good. It had my biting my fingernails. You forget that it is a non-fiction book. The author brings out this man's passion for what he does and his skill at doing it so very well. I highly recommend it. Dr. Owlsley worked on so many important investigations into very public tragedies because of his skill. Enjoy!

    Insanely intriguing book. Owsley is a true hero here. I had no idea about the legal battle behind the Kennewick Man skeleton, and I'm flabbergasted to have read what transpired. I'm both pissed off and in awe. Amazing book.

    A surprisingly engaging and exciting story. I could have done without going into the life story of every ancillary character who appears (a pet peeve of mine for books like these feels like filler to stretch the page count), but it was otherwise really entertaining.

    There are kind of two stories interwoven here. The book begins with the story of Doug Owsley and the work he has done and was doing during the course of events in the book. I like archeology and I like hearing about other people's jobs. I never imagined that being a museum curator for the Smithsonian could involve all of the travel and research Dr. Owsley does. The second story is the story of the discovery and subsequent legal battle over Kennewick Man, a 10,000 year old skeleton discovered nea [...]

    This book started out strong, but when the author brought in the Kennewick Man case, it kind of fell to pieces. There were short chapters about Doug Owsley's work, but the bulk of the book was about the legal case surrounding Kennewick Man. The author basically fawns all over the scientists and minimizes the Native Tribes' claims to their ancestor. The book ends with, "We won the case, aren't we great, ha ha." (Not a direct quote.) Now they look stupid because DNA testing has proven Kennewick Ma [...]

    This book is as much a biography of its main subject, Dr. Doug Owsley, as it is a chronicle of anthropology case studies. Owsley is the head of the Physical Anthropology Division at the Smithsonian Institute of Natural History, and as such is often called to consult on forensic crime and historic cases. My specific interest is in forensic case studies and I enjoyed reading about those, but it was also interesting to read about some of the historic anthropologic work that has been done. A large p [...]

    I enjoyed reading this book about Dr. Doug Owsley. The book reads as a biography of Dr. Owsley who I think is truly an amazing and gifted man.He is the top Smithsonian Forensic Scientist and has been on every kind of case you can think of from identifying 9/11 victims to researching the world's oldest remains.The book will let you follow a few of the amazing cases he has been apart of.A large part of this book will follow the court case surrounding Kennewick Man that Dr Owsley was a main part of [...]

    Forensic anthropologist Doug Owsley has used his skills to identify many skeletons in a variety of situations. When a mummy that challenges traditional thinking of the arrival of humans to North America surfaces in Kennewick, WA, Doug leads a legal challenge for the right to study it.I love forensic anthropology, so this was an interesting book. However, it didn't go deep enough into the identification and methods for my liking. Part of it was probably due to a second-hand narrator. I found the [...]

    Fascinating and controversial story about scientists/archaeologists versus Native Americans for the right to study the remains of the oldest known Native American in North America versus the right to rebury an ancestor. One has to look at both sides of the story to get the full and complete history of the disagreements between scientists/archaeologists and Native Americans. While scientists and archaeologists have a right to understand the past, Native Americans also have the right to guard and [...]

    Very interesting topic. The writer's style was frustrating. He started a thread but then dropped it. In one case he resolved it by having the husband of an attorney reappear after surgery, years later with no further mention of that medical condition. My other example is the discovery of a saber tooth tiger den that seemed to have a human tooth at the site. No more details given. In another writer's hands, I would have liked this a lot more. As it stands, I could have just read up on Kennewick M [...]

    A story that could easily have come out dry given the strong focus on legal issues surrounding Kennewick Man, but Benedict pitches the inter-agency fracas at a level that's compelling and well-paced for his non-attorney audience. Definitely raises some interesting issues that need to be more fully addressed in the ongoing effort to balance the rights of Native Americans to protect their ancestors and heritage with the value of scientific research into the broader origin story of humanity.

    Great random pick from the local history section of the library. Engrossing, fast-paced, and the author does a good job of showing the legal and political intricacies that arise from anthropology/archaeology with the Kennewick Man case. It would be nice to have a more recent edition of the book detailing how the Kennewick Man case has played out in the 10 years since the book was published, but the Internet can fill in those gaps.

    I checked out Jeff Benedict's No Bone Unturned twice from the library. Unfortunately I just cannot bring myself to read about a Smithsonian forensic scientist who would not repatriate Kennewick Man's bones back to the Native American tribes who claimed him. From reading the front and back flaps this book paints the scientist as a good guy. It's upsetting to me when the government is doing the right thing for Native American tribes and then this guy comes along. It upsets me too much to read it.

    A highly enjoyable and very readable book in spite of the fact that the prologue was written in complete fanboy mode. The book is obviously biased towards the efforts of the scientists he is profiling but not so much so that he paints the opposition as monsters. Book is very readable for anyone just interested, there is very little jargon or hard science it it. The engaging, easy going writing style made it a page turner and a good book to while away a couple of rainy afternoons.

    This is quite an interesting look at the work of the top bone expert at the Smithsonian. It walks through a number of cases but focuses on the fight to allow the study of the ancient skeleton of Kennewick man. It is clearly told from his side, but it is a fascinating look at a scientist fighting for science. The writing is a bit choppy and awkward in places, and sometimes I would like more detail and less hero-worship, but overall a good read!

    This was an interesting book about the life and work of Dr. Douglass Owsley, a forensic anthropologist. The cases were very interesting - especially the recounting of the case against the federal government for Kennewick Man; however the writing left much to be desired. Benedict held Owsley up to such regard that it made the book a bit over-the-top at times. Overall it was interesting, but not recommended.

    Fascinating and informative. I could not put it down from the first page to the last. Read it in a single sitting of 5 hours skipping my dinner such was the urge to continue reading I could not break off to cook anything! Thoroughly recommend. Also an excellent bibliography that will provide further hours of reading pleasure.

    A very interesting look into the legality behind science. When is something scientific? When is it personal? This book looks at the argument. It does not pretend to be unbiased - this is a scientific look, not a cultural one. There is a little too much pre-history at the beginning about other bones that hold me back from a 5 star, however.

    I found this really interesting, with modern examples and ancient examples of the use of forensic anthropology. It bounces back and forth between a few ongoing stories which I'm not sure is the best approach but it works. Would have loved to have more examples.

    Here's my issue. The introduction to the book makes it seem as if the focus would be mainly on the forensic scientist and show lots of case studies. Instead, the main focus is on the Kennewick man. Its a very good book, but caveat emptor.

    The contest for the bones of Kennewick man was a bit boring, but there was a lot of interesting information about Native Americans. Interested by the conclusion that another group of humans may have moved east to west.

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